SEC vs Ripple could be extended to 2022 – here are the next steps

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's lawsuit against crypto payments company Ripple is taking much longer than expected. The lawsuit filed by the SEC against Ripple in December alleges that Ripple raised more than $1.3 billion by selling XRP in pending unregistered securities offerings. The company has denied the SEC's allegations and wants the issue resolved as soon as possible. However, Jeremy Hogan, a lawyer who closely follows the case, predicts that without a settlement, the case will continue until early 2022. Earlier this week, a New York court gave until October 15 to find the facts. However, this is not the only obstacle. Attorney James Filan, a good commentator on the case, gathered all the important data holding the case back. #XRPCommunity #SEC_NEWS v. #Ripple #XRP Updated events, images courtesy of @stedas pic.twitter.com/Kp4UHAxnHX — James K. Filan (@FilanLaw) June 18, 2021 yet to explain what happened. 18 June Two days ago, the case would reach an important turning point. In March, the judge forced the SEC to release its emails and internal documents regarding Bitcoin, Ethereum, and XRP by June 18. But on June 14, the court granted the SEC's request to extend the deadline for another two months. So, apart from a series of emails – exchanges from the Office of Investor Education and Advocacy, the public education service trying to help people "invest wisely and avoid fraud." Ripple believes these emails will show whether the SEC is biased against top cryptocurrencies and whether the SEC takes that baggage to court. These emails are not public at the time of writing. The judge also has yet to decide whether the SEC will disclose its internal trade policy regarding crypto. By July 2nd, internal documents as well as email correspondence from the main FinHub mailbox on SEC, Bitcoin, Ethereum, and XRP

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