People should know that Bitcoin and Wall Street Bitcoin are two different things

Ben Hunt, chief investment officer at Second Foundation Partners, believes that Bitcoin's integration made the original use case boring and contained unacceptable trade-offs. The main cryptocurrency is based on the principles of consent and resistance to censorship without consent. In short, it's a way to stay connected with the organization. But as Wall Street increasingly collaborates with Bitcoin for its own purposes, Hunt sees an impending Bitcoin identity crisis. Institutions are fast approaching Recently, institutions have gotten to know Bitcoin in depth. A popular method for institutions to invest in the main cryptocurrency is through the use of grayscale asset managers. Grayscale only deals with accredited investors. This means they serve people who earn more than $ 200,000 a year and have a net worth of over $ 1 million. Or any beneficial owner who meets the above criteria for organizations, organizations or individuals with more than $ 5 million in cash. Grayscale's fourth quarter 2020 report showed last year's total entry was four times the cumulative entry of the previous seven years. More than half of 2020 will arrive in the last quarter of 2020. “Quarter of $ 3 billion: Grayscale saw unprecedented demand from investors, with an inflow of approximately $ 3.3 billion. Investments in the Grayscale product family exceeded $ 5.7 billion in 2020, more than four times the cumulative input of $ 1.2 billion in 2013-2019 products. “Some of the big Wall Street players are also looking directly at Bitcoin. BNY Mellon, Goldman Sachs, and Morgan Stanley, to name a few, all gave their consent. Their sudden interest in Bitcoin is for many reasons. A common theme of banks is increased investor appetite for cryptocurrencies. There's also the cover story gaining momentum as investors prepare for an impending economic crash. Inventor Satoshi Nakamoto wanted his work to work as an alternative.

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