Bitcoin won’t and may not be a currency in the US, says Michael Saylor

MicroStrategy CEO and bitcoin bull Michael Sailor says it’s not possible for bitcoin to be used as a currency in the US.

Saylor has been a prolific supporter of bitcoin since MicroStrategy added top crypto assets to its balance sheet in August 2020.

 
Despite his call for bitcoin, Saylor tells crypto analyst Scott Melker that he believes it would be better for BTC if it was seen as a property rather than a currency.

“I don’t think bitcoin will become a currency in the US. I don’t think it should be like this. I logically think this should be seen as a property. It’s like owning a building or owning a gold bullion or owning stocks. This is a property.

O демонетизирует other property. If you have a million dollars and you need to choose whether you’re buying a collection, a house or a second home, or an Etf or an Apple stock, or starting a business or buying art, or buying a gold bullion, or buying bitcoin. That’s the only decision you need to do.”

Saylor compares Bitcoin to Apple, Amazon and Google and says betting against significant advances in technology has historically been a bad choice.

“If you buy and love it, that’s a good thing, and at any time in the history of technology, if you sell it, you’ve made a mistake, haven’t you? With a caveat, you need to buy a winner. You should buy the” killer ” category. You should buy Facebook, Google, Amazon, Apple, Microsoft. 

So the question is, how long should you watch them win before you decide they’ve won? I think 30 years is a little late. If you have to wait 30 years before picking a winner, you probably won’t get any October profits. But you can see them making 10 years and you can buy them and still make a lot of money.”

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